Ed Verosky Interviewed : On A Successful Nude Photography Journey

This month, we were honored to interview an inspiring and talented Nude photographer Ed Verosky, whose stunning nude artworks will surely catch your eyes.

Ed Verosky is a photographer, currently based in Austin, TX.  He has been in the photo industry for nearly 30 years, with major focus in the nude photography. So, if fine art nude photography is a subject of interest to you check this interview.

1. When & how did your journey as a nude photographer begin?

I didn’t start out with any interest in doing nude or bodyscape photography. During my time as a wedding photographer, I noticed that other wedding photographers were offering boudoir albums. 

I decided to give it a try and discovered a had a knack for it; a way of working that made my clients comfortable. Some of my boudoir clients asked for tasteful nudes/figure studies. So, I actually got into that kind of work as a way to offer a product that was in demand.

2. You’ve been in the industry for over 30 years. Where do you get your creative inspiration from?

I’m inspired by the work of other photographers, past, and present. I’m most inspired by portrait artists and fashion photographers. 

Books and monographs are great ways to get inspiration. And there are a few people on Instagram I follow. Very few of these are standard commercial photographers.

3. Nude art photography, unlike other niches, is very challenging. What were some of the hurdles you encountered in the beginning?

The only hurdles I encountered were in my own mind. I come from a religiously conservative background; although I’m not particularly religious.

I’m also married and take my relationship very seriously. So, I took some time thinking about how I felt about this type of photography since I’d never considered it before. I had a feeling that I’d be very good at it. It turns out that I was very comfortable in situations like that, and this type of photography seems natural to me.

4. What is it about nude photography that fascinates you the most?

I think what fascinates me is the way it can mean different things to different people.  There’s the person modeling.  There’s the photographer.  Then the viewers of the images. 

The process of making the images and viewing them is different for each person.  For me, I’m just amazed at how the figure is like art, to begin with.  The light and shadows just make it possible to present the figure in so many ways.  The fact that nude photography evokes so many possible reactions is also fascinating.

5. You have a community of over 75000 learners. How did you build such a huge audience?

I’m not sure how large the audience is.  I would think that my YouTube videos are what bring new people around.  I don’t do much on other platforms like Instagram or Twitter, but I do have a Facebook group called About Photography.  

6. Could you describe a typical nude photography shoot?

They are very similar to other types of shoots. I prepare my model or client with information prior to any shoot. We should both know exactly what the shoot will consist of. I treat everyone with respect and consideration.

The rapport is friendly and workman-like; the model and I are both there to get an end product. Lights are set up and arranged according to the various looks we’re trying to achieve.

And the model and I interact with each other the same as we would in any other kind of shoot. Of course, if the model is new or nervous (which can be the case with non-models and clients), I think once the photography starts everything just gets into a flow. I also try to keep these shoot short.

7. How do you choose your models? Can you tell us more about your working process?

If it’s a paying client, they’re the ones making the choice. Of course, you can turn them down, but I don’t think I ever have. If it’s a model, it’s really more about personality and professionalism than their figure.

I want to work with people who just want to make beautiful pictures. A model needs to have some degree of confidence and should want to express something positive. If I have an idea for a set of images, or a tutorial featuring boudoir or nudes, I’ll usually start with people I’ve already worked with.

If I want to use someone new, I’ll look around at different sites and postings and contact people I think have a professional attitude about this type of work. The model must be of legal age and have a valid ID.

We’ll agree on the type of shoot, the price, and other details. When the model arrives at the shoot, we’ll spend a few minutes talking over the ideas (I also like to let the model know that they can share ideas as we go along).

After the shoot, the model signs a release. If it’s part of the agreement, I’ll provide the model with a set of images for the agreed-upon use.

8. What would we find in your camera bag for a typical shoot?

I will use a digital camera for most of the work.  A film camera if I have time.  50mm lens or equivalent.  An 85mm lens.  I like to keep the gear very minimal.

9. Three tips you would like to give for someone who wants to start shooting fine art nudes

One: Keep everything legal, whatever that means in your part of the world. Get an ID.

Two: Think about what you will and won’t do in terms of interaction and live by those boundaries. Have consideration and be respectful at all times.

Three: Start your journey by hiring someone who does this type of posing professionally. Let them know you are new, and that you would appreciate any tips and advice during the process. A good model will be happy to help offer feedback and suggestions for poses. You don’t have to be perfect at first, just get used to the process. Good images will come with time and experience.

10. What are your plans for the upcoming year?

I plan to do more online teaching, and to help other people become online instructors.  I’ve got a strong background in web design, development and marketing. 

So, I think I’d like to help other professionals monetize their expertise.  Currently, I’m working on a new project called PepperEngine.com that will help photographers and other experts make money teaching online.

11. How was your experience dealing with the pandemic? Did it have any impact on your photography business? If so, can you share a little bit about it?

It stopped any client work and I choose to be careful about working with anyone indoors.

So, yes, it had a big impact, and it still does.  But I’m looking at options to work in larger rented studios.  We’ll see how all that goes.  I will begin working on outdoor shoots again soon.

Ed has published several books and courses about photography, many of which are available at VeroskyCourses.com and he’s got a blog at EdVerosky.com.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest

Create Magical Composite Photos in One Click With StudioMagic

An awesome & easy to use tool for every photographer
  • Enviro: Add Photo Effects for Different Seasons
  • Lightingeffex: Create Effects That Mimic Those of Natural Light
  • Reflections: Nuanced Images of Water & Mirror Reflections
  • Compositor: Add Popular Image Enhancements Like a Moon, a Rainbow, or Lightning
  • Hyperzap: Give Photos a Contemporary Edge Using Color Pop or Grunge Boost Effects
Categories

Weekly Newsletter

Top