Dave Cross Interview: Understanding & Learning Photoshop Like a Photoshop Junkie

Don’t you wish that learning Photoshop was as easy as snapping on a lens? Unless you’ve been stuck under a rock for the last 20+ years, you already know that learning Photoshop is one of the things about photography that you either enjoy completely or avoid at all costs. It’s difficult, time-consuming, and complex.

Dave Cross, a Photoshop instructor based in Florida, would agree. Learning it takes a great deal of patience, but if you were to really stick it out, the rewards could be boundless. Since 1987, he has been teaching Adobe products to photographers and other creative professionals and has taught an easy-to-understand approach to the mastering it. He’s one of most prominent — and one of our favorite — educators around.

In this interview, we asked Dave a few questions about his beginnings in Photoshop and got him to explain why using layers can make Photoshop much easier to use.

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Natalie Kita Interview: Capturing the Unique Beauty of Every Woman

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Natalie Kita, a high-end boudoir photographer based in Delaware, prefers simplicity. Putting aside conceptual projects where ideas become more important than people, Kita has carved out a sizable following for her intimate, in-the-moment shoots that emphasize the unique beauty of everyday women.

Believing that a boudoir shoot can be a “life-changing experience,” Kita goes into every shoot with a practiced understanding of how to make a client comfortable with the camera and, most importantly, with the client’s own body. In this interview, we wanted to learn a little more about Kita and find out how she got started, while also trying to uncover a few practical lessons on shooting one of the most demanding genres of photography.

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Boudoir Photography NYC

Top Ten Boudoir Photographers In New York

Boudoir photography has been around since the 1920s and though the times (and technology) have significantly changed, the cultural appreciation of a woman’s beauty has not. Originally referring to a room for sulking in, boudoir is now known as a modern day style of glamour photography that focuses on the aesthetic appeal of women.

While boudoir photography sessions are more popular than ever, a majority of women are nervous to share intimate moments with a complete stranger. So it becomes imperative to get a professional boudoir photographer if you’re planning a boudoir photo shoot. A good photographer will not only be able to help you understand how to pose for boudoir photos, he or she will also make it a point that you’re confident with the poses. You can go over the boudoir photo shoot ideas with your photographer as well as discuss what is it that you are comfortable with.

To lend a helping hand, we have compiled a list of the top 10 destinations for Boudoir Photography NYC

Along with contact information, we will also add reviews or tips from the photographers themselves. This compilation is the best of Boudoir Photography NYC and all of the following studios and photographers are highly rated and are very successful.

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Boudoir Photography Tips – How To Make Her Feel Comfortable

Boudoir photography is huge right now. There are so many women out there, who aren’t necessarily models, looking for classy, sexy photos. Boudoir photographs make a woman feel beautiful. They make her feel sensual, and they can, if taken properly give her some newfound confidence. They also make the perfect gift for her partner, so, of course, she’s going to look and feel her best!

‘Boudoir’ is of French origin, meaning a woman’s bedroom or sitting room. So it won’t come as any surprise that most boudoir photography takes place in an intimate setting like a bedroom or hotel. Or if you don’t have access to this, your own boudoir setting within your photography studio.

Boudoir photography tips - for newbie

Romantic, sexy, soft, sensual, and sometimes even naughty…these are all characteristics of what makes a good boudoir picture. It doesn’t matter if you’ve been in the game for years or you’re just starting out as a boudoir photographer, you’re probably still on the look out for some hot boudoir photography tips.

When it comes to boudoir photography tips for the budding boudoir photographer, you’ve got to remember your primary goal – make your subject feel totally at ease while capturing them in the most flattering way possible. No woman wants to be left feeling vulnerable and unattractive.

We’ve compiled some of the best boudoir photography tips there are to help you get it right from the outset. You need to know your subject well (not too well obviously) and you need to find the right poses that compliment your client’s body type.

Regardless of what people might think, boudoir photographs aren’t sleazy. They’ve been around since the early 1900s and were a favorite amongst the aristocratic women of that time. So keep it classy and shoot your subjects well.

Here are some of the best boudoir photography tips for every boudoir photographer.

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Smart Posing Tips to Capture Perfect Male Portrait Photographs

For anyone who is used to photographing females, shooting male models photos poses can be an intimidating task. The entire atmosphere on the photography set might feel different if you are about to photograph a male.

For starters, it is important to get into why this is so. And an understanding of these reasons might actually help you de-construct male models photos poses.
It is no surprise that women and men are different from each other.

When they come to be photographed, they come in with different expectation, goals and images attached to them already. The trend of the day dictates that female portrait photoshoots usually revolve more around fashion and glamour. Hence, photographing them involves focusing more on their beauty, makeup, clothes and accessories.

This might not be the case with male portrait photography. Unless the photoshoot is for a fashion label, male portrait photoshoots rarely emphasize clothing, accessories or enhanced beauty.

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strip club photos - Ivar Wigan_Bright Lights_2014

“The Gods,” a series of photographs made by the Scottish photographer Ivar Wigan, takes its title from a nickname given in Atlanta to those who survive street life long enough to look back, each now a veteran of a hard-fought life. Wigan spent over eight weeks researching, meeting, befriending, and, ultimately, photographing the people of Atlanta, staying late at its strip clubs, where dancers perform without stigma, and at parties that collapsed into the morning.

As an outsider far removed from the culture’s intricacies, there was a risk of projecting bias or ignorance. Wigan refrained from photographing until he was sure he had permission. “It’s not possible to make this kind of work without developing relationships,” he told me. “To make this kind of work the artist needs to be working from within the scene he is representing.”

Wigan spoke to us over email last month.

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Lindsay Adler Interview: Bold, Fearless Portraits of Fashion & Color

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As a fashion photographer, business owner, and teacher, Lindsay Adler photography has made a brand for herself in the world. And the clearest distillation of this brand might be her line of ebooks and videos that work through the mystery of creating good images by meeting it halfway. You can teach only so much about photography, and the part of deciding when to press the trigger may be ultimately unteachable. So, instead, her videos show new photographers what part does what and by how much — as, say, a dance instructor might impress upon you when to move your feet where, giving you some idea of what it’s like to feel your body moving on beat, but never truly giving you a way to feel what all the back and forth actually means.

While shooting, Adler is firm but positive. She believes in empathizing with the person photographed. Against a trigger-happy, aggressive approach that comforts the one doing the shooting with an ever greater amount of shots, she prepares beforehand and collaborates with her team on set to minimize a sitter’s time in front of a camera. It’s her brand of creativity, photography, and teaching that has won her financial success and critical notice. And it’s why we wanted to speak with Adler about her ideas on photography.

Adler spoke to us over email last week.

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Frank Doorhof Interview: From Being Bullied to Commercial Portrait Photography

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In 2012, the last time Frank Doorhof spoke to us, he had recently joined Kelby Training as a workshop lecturer and was already gaining international recognition for his glamour, fashion, and commercial portrait photography. How have the previous four years treated him? Well, it turns out that he hasn’t lost any steam. He’s still making exciting work while gaining more and more fans every day.

For this interview, we wanted to revisit our first conversation with more personal questions. Instead of asking about technique, we wanted to ask about Doorhof’s journey into commercial portrait photography. We wanted to know more about him. We learned, for example, that Doorhof was bullied when he was young — “without a doubt, this forced me to improve myself constantly” — and that photography, in its way of putting you in front of others no matter how you feel, has given him a way to find his most open, friendly, and generous self.

We spoke with Doorhof over email last week.

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Parker Day Interview: Imagining the Glittering Beauty of the Outré

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Trying to tell somebody what you loved most of Parker Day’s model portrait photography after one look is like being asked which part of a landscape you noticed while riding a roller coaster. Windswept and twitchy, you’d probably pick what’s most obvious and readily brought back to mind. “I don’t know — the blue sky, I guess,” you’d probably say. This is also true with the Los Angeles photographer’s portraits. They are high energy. All the loud character, fluorescent greens, and candy-apple reds, captured in vibrant 35mm film, have a way of making every detail jump out in high speed until all that’s left to remember is color.

To be fully appreciated, each portrait should be seen slowly and with a careful eye. Not doing so may cause you to veer into a funhouse of interpretive strands, making the ride a little too bumpy. There’s a lot going on, and her portraits celebrate this particularity: they both relish the fine detail and also recognize a particularity individual to every person. Together, they’re a triumph of difference —even if they’re emboldened by color and persona. What better way to satirize heteronormative ideals than to offer a world of three-eyed waitresses, chocolate-eating mermaids, or disco-dancing mutants? Is it a bit campy? Sure, but it still makes you wonder who these characters are being compared to. Which imagined sameness are they supposedly transgressing? Give me more of this than anything normal and sane, I say.

I spoke to Parker Day about her model portrait photography work over email.

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Abelardo Morell Interview: Capturing the Topsy-Turvy Fantasies of the Camera Obscura

Morell Photography demands attention from the viewer. 

 Morell Photography - Featured

In 1991, Abelardo Morell captured something that might have never been photographed before. Even though many people had seen what he saw, Morell was the first to make a career capturing the images that come to life when using a camera obscura. Taking around eight hours to properly expose on 4 x 5 film, each photograph is a jumbled puzzle of interiors and exteriors. One way to read them is to do so in shorthand. You can, for example, use all the shapes, colors, and signs that you see above to conjure up Times Square. It would be easy. Nobody would call you crazy, but to do so would obscure a more important reading.

Making what’s inside the picture fit an image inside your head falls back on a way seeing that these photographs try to cancel. Morell photography asks for a different way of seeing: they remind you that it’s okay to imagine something else. If you want to see beyond the appearance of things, who cares? The logic of his photographs is the same of a dream. You can, as you did as a kid, let one shapeshifting fantasy unfold to the next, see shadows and light play out on the ceilings, floors, and walls like stories, all being created and destroyed out of nothing.

I spoke to Morell over email about how he got started and about what he thinks about his process.

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